Best Brad Nailer

RANK
#1

Overall Rating

based on 12643 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎CRAFTSMAN

Item Weight: ‎32.5 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎16.5 x 16.5 x 17.88 inches

Batteries Included: ‎No

Batteries Required: ‎No

RANK
#2

Overall Rating

based on 7373 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎Bostitch

Item Weight: ‎7.7 ounces

Product Dimensions: ‎3 x 1 x 6 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Color: ‎Coated

Material: ‎Steel

RANK
#3

Overall Rating

based on 6978 reviews

8.8

Manufacturer: ‎YEAHOME

Item Weight: ‎2.35 pounds

Color: ‎4000staples

Material: Type ‎Alloy Steel

RANK
#4

Overall Rating

based on 5900 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎WEN

Item Weight: ‎2.7 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎10 x 8.25 x 2.75 inches

Batteries Required: ‎No

RANK
#5

Overall Rating

based on 5029 reviews

8.8

Manufacturer: ‎Stanley

Item Weight: ‎1.41 ounces

Product Dimensions: ‎5.9 x 3 x 3.6 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Power Source: ‎Corded Electric

Voltage : ‎120 Volts

RANK
#6

Overall Rating

based on 4946 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎PORTER-CABLE

Item Weight: ‎5.9 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎13.88 x 5 x 12 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Power Source: ‎Battery-Powered

Voltage : ‎20 Volts

RANK
#7

Overall Rating

based on 4780 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎Bostitch

Item Weight: ‎3.84 ounces

Product Dimensions: ‎2 x 1 x 6 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Color: ‎Silver

Material: ‎Steel

RANK
#8

Overall Rating

based on 4652 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎Dewalt

Item Weight: ‎37 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎30 x 30 x 30 inches

Power Source: ‎Battery Powered

Voltage : ‎20 Volts

Batteries Included: ‎Yes

RANK
#9

Overall Rating

based on 3892 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎Bostitch

Item Weight: ‎41.8 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎21.13 x 19.5 x 18 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Color: ‎Yellow

Power Source: ‎Ac

RANK
#10

Overall Rating

based on 2673 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎Dewalt

Item Weight: ‎5.1 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎13.03 x 3.74 x 13.09 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Color: ‎Yellow

Power Source: ‎Pneumatic

Buyer's Guide: Best Brad Nailer

What is a Brad Nailer used for?


Do you get tired of hitting tiny fine nails with your fingers? I can't even count how many times I have smacked my nails instead of my fingers. The good news is that my nails and fingers are damaged so I don’t have to count. However, I will need to purchase a new nailer, just like you. Instead of getting nailed by yourself, we will show you how to get a Brad Nailer.


What is a Brad Nailer exactly?


A Brad Nailer, a special type of nail gun designed for woodwork detail, is one such example. A Brad Nailer is a new type of nail gun that has replaced traditional hammers. You don't need to worry about your thumb getting hurt while you hammer nails.


Brad Nailer uses "Brads", which are thin-gauged nails that are used for binding light-weight wood trims. It is very difficult to drive these small, 18-gauge nails into wood trim manually. The thin nails can be easily penetrated by the electric force. These Brad nails are nearly invisible in wood trim. This means you won't have to cover large nails sticking out of wood with carpenter glue.


You can renovate wooden structures in your home with 18 gauge brad nails. A brad nailer is a handy tool that you can keep with you at all times. Brad nailers are a great tool to use for everything from finishing your carpentry projects to trimming and molding, but also to add a little bit of flair to your work.


18 Gauge Brad Nailer Uses


Although I don't know if homeowners are out there, I do try to maintain the house and fix small problems. My house stays in great condition because of this. Brad nails of 18 gauge are much thinner and less likely crack lighter-weight wood boards. Here are some other uses for an 18-gauge Brad Nailer.


Baseboards


Because they are so small, Brad Nails are the ideal way to attach baseboards to walls. Brads can be driven into wood very easily. This allows you to attach smaller pieces of wood easily to larger ones.


Carpenter putty is not necessary for concealing ugly holes or nails. I've been talking about the Brad nails' thinness for quite some time now. You probably know that they don’t leave visible holes in the wood surface. Wood putty is not necessary to conceal such visible holes since there aren't any.


Crown Molding:


Crown molding is used for the ceiling and baseboards. A standard ceiling in an American home will have a border between the ceiling and wall. Crown molding is what you see. These moldings can be done with thin nails that are not visible. For such cases, a brad nailer is possible.


You can also do small home renovations and crafts: A Brad Nailer is the best tool for attaching rails, stops and coves to small pieces of wood. Some people find home renovation easier than others. This is primarily because it saves time and makes the process more enjoyable. The Brad nailer is simple to use and can be used to complete small renovation projects without hiring a carpenter. Brad nailers are great for small projects like picture frames. You can teach your children if you are a responsible adult. Learning how to use a tool early can help your kids become responsible adults.


Brad Nailer Sizes


Depending on how you use your nailer, Brad Nails come in different sizes. There are two types of Brad Nails available on the market: 21-gauge Brad Nailers and 18-gauge Brad Nailers. However, they have different uses. Because they can attach multiple wooden boards more easily, 18-gauge brad nails are preferred. It is more powerful than the 21-gauge needle nailer. Next, consider the size of your Brads and Nails. Consider the thickness of the material that you will be nailing when choosing a Brad Nail. The ideal length for your nail should be three times the thickness of the material. This ensures that the nail penetrates and attaches to the material fully.


Understanding Gauge


The seller will always ask you which gauge you are looking for when you buy nails. The gauge is the measurement of the size or thickness of the nail. The smaller the diameter of your nail is, the greater its gauge. Finish Nails are 15-16 gauge and are made of thicker wire. Brad Nails, which are 18 gauge, are thinner than Finish Nails. The gauge can be used to determine how easily the nail will be driven into the material. Larger gauges are easier to drive than smaller ones.


What's the Difference Between Brad Nailers & Finish Nailers?


Untrained eyes may think that a Brad Nailer is the same as a Finish Nailer. But, you must realize that they have different purposes.


The Brad Nailer works more like a precision worker. It is designed to fire pin-like, fine nails called Brads. If we compare the size of a Brad Nailer to a finish nailer, it is also smaller. Brad nailers have a smaller size and less binding power. They are best used for small projects and mounting light-weight cabinet trims.


Finish nailers, on the other hand offer stronger holds. A thinner gauge (approximately 15-16) indicates a thicker nail. A finish nailer is best if you need to fix bulkier or heavier wood trims. A finish nailer can hold approximately 1-2.5 inches of nails. The 15-16-gauge nailer offers greater strength. It can be used to fix large pieces of furniture or plywood and attach large baseboards on walls. You can use finish nailers for many purposes.


You have the option to choose between these two gadgets, depending on what you use them for. You can split a thinner board by using a finish nailer with it. Be careful choosing the right nailer for your DIY projects.


Are you looking for electric versus air power? Which do you prefer?


There are two types of Brad Nailers: the air-powered pneumatic and the battery-powered cordless. The pneumatic nailer uses an air compressor that is attached to the nailer via a pipe. Air pressure changes can exert tremendous force on the nail, allowing it to penetrate whatever material it is being pointed at. The 1.5 amp hour battery used by electric nails converts electrical energy to kinetic energy. This allows the nails to be shot with tremendous force.


Pneumatic nailers tend to be more expensive than battery-powered ones. However, you will need an air compressor and attachments to power your pneumatic nailer. This can add up. Because they don't require a cord, battrery powered nailers can be carried around with you while you work.


Pneumatic nailers are lighter because they don't have a battery. However, you need to consider the weight of any hose that is attached. Some people find it annoying to have to carry the compressor around.


Pneumatic nailers perform better because they fire the nail immediately after you press the button. The electric nailer takes a while to spin up before firing. The electric nailer can also have heat buildup problems.


It doesn't all depend on the machine. Your application determines which nailer is right for you.

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