Best Beginner Circular Saw

RANK
#1

Overall Rating

based on 11526 reviews

8.8

Manufacturer: ‎WEN

Item Weight: ‎3.6 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎7 x 11.5 x 3.8 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Color: ‎As the picture show

Power Source: ‎Corded-electric

RANK
#2

Overall Rating

based on 8133 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎SKIL

Item Weight: ‎8.7 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎14.2 x 9.8 x 8.5 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Color: ‎Original version

Material: ‎Blend

RANK
#3

Overall Rating

based on 8125 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎Black & Decker

Item Weight: ‎4.6 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎11.75 x 4.38 x 9.25 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Color: ‎Black

Power Source: ‎Corded Electric

RANK
#4

Overall Rating

based on 7484 reviews

9.0

Manufacturer: ‎Positec USA

Item Weight: ‎4.4 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎15.08 x 4.17 x 5.79 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Color: ‎Black

Power Source: ‎Corded Electric

RANK
#5

Overall Rating

based on 6998 reviews

9.6

Manufacturer: ‎Dewalt

Item Weight: ‎7.5 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎11 x 8 x 10 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Material: ‎Other

Power Source: ‎Corded Electric

RANK
#6

Overall Rating

based on 5897 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎Peachtree Woodworking Supply Inc

Item Weight: ‎2.07 pounds

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Material: ‎Plastic and Foam Rubber

Batteries Included: ‎No

Batteries Required: ‎No

RANK
#7

Overall Rating

based on 5718 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎Koki Holdings America, Ltd

Item Weight: ‎24.5 pounds

Power Source: ‎Corded Electric

Voltage : ‎120 Volts

Batteries Required: ‎No

RANK
#8

Overall Rating

based on 4179 reviews

9.6

Manufacturer: ‎Dewalt

Item Weight: ‎6.6 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎17.88 x 5.13 x 6.69 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Color: ‎Black

Material: ‎Metal

RANK
#9

Overall Rating

based on 3996 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎Black & Decker

Item Weight: ‎7.28 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎17.69 x 5.02 x 13.77 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Color: ‎Black/Orange

Power Source: ‎Battery-Powered

RANK
#10

Overall Rating

based on 3871 reviews

9.4

Manufacturer: ‎Black & Decker

Item Weight: ‎4.47 pounds

Product Dimensions: ‎11.5 x 3.44 x 9.25 inches

Is Discontinued By Manufacturer: ‎No

Power Source: ‎Corded Electric

Voltage : ‎120 Volts

Buyer's Guide: Best Beginner Circular Saw

Beginner's Guide To A Circular Saw

Working with a beginner circular saw may be quite complex for beginners. But if you know the basic mechanics of this power tool, you can complete more projects with greater speed. The primary consideration to take into account is the lower cutting blade cover. It helps if you determined the condition of the various parts of this powerful instrument beforehand, and how you can make it work well.

There are four main parts to the circular saw - the blade, the table, the jig-saw bed, and the motor assembly. The major factor that affects all these four parts is the condition of the blades. If the blades are dull or otherwise not functioning properly, they will not cut properly or they will break at the edges. Dull blades will also reduce the amount of spinning speed that the saw produces, so the cut will be less smooth and therefore not as effective.

The blade is attached to the circular saw with an adjustable clamp. To fix the blade in place, use the appropriate clamps, and make sure that the adjustment screws are tight enough to hold the blade in position, while loosening enough that they can be removed with a pair of pliers, or by soaking the clamps in water, which will loosen the screws and let the blade free of the clamp. It is essential that you do this carefully, as the screw clamps are made of plastic, which can be severely bent if too much pressure is applied. Do not try to use too much force, as the saw's motor is connected to the blade and if the motor is damaged, your circular saw could be useless.

The next step is to ensure that the lower blade is lined up with the uppermost portion of the circular saw blade. To do this, lower the blade guard until it lines up with the top of the slot in the upper slot of the circular saw. Then slide the guard out of its slot and attach it to the lower part of the blade. The lower blade guard should extend straight down from the saw's table and be parallel with the ground.

Now that the blades and the guide rivulets have been mounted, and with the blade tight against the table, it is time to set up the hold-down clamp. The hold-down clamp is a piece of metal tubing with an opening on one end; it is screwed into the saw's table. Make sure that the hold-down clamp is mounted on the table securely, with no loose hardware. You will attach the hold-down clamp to the uppermost portion of the circular saw blade. If you are using an older model saw, the hold-down clamp may either be made from metal tubing or plastic.

The third step is to secure the blade to the saw's table. To do this, make sure that the blade is lined up with the hole for the blade in the saw's table-end cap. With a Phillips-style screwdriver, remove the screw that secures the blade to the saw's body. You can insert a screwdriver or other sized object into the hole to serve as a lever to guide the blade into place. With the blade lined up, clamp the blade firmly but not tightly. Clamp the blade so that it is approximately centered with the workpiece and perpendicular to the direction of rotation of the saw.

With the blade installed, set the saw up in your work shop and prepare the material to be cut by using a drill gun and a low-powered orbital sander. Line up the circular saw's rear teeth with the holes in your material. Use a small, fine-grit orbital sander to remove any excess material from the material. With the orbital sander, work the sanding strokes in the same direction as the grain of your material and stop if needed. You may need to re-chop the material at this point.

Now that the lower blade is in place, set the cam lever to zero and slowly turn the knob to lock the saw's movement in the downward position. Using the circular saw's zero angle as your guide, begin chipping away at your project. The lower blade should move back and forth as you remove material and continue the process until the saw blade has finished cutting the material. Finish by cleaning the saw and repositioning the lower blade so that it is lined up with the rear teeth of the new saw blade.

*Disclaimer: Power Tools Planet is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking. (665)